Updated: March 20, 2019

 

In 1980, Jimmy Carter declared March 8th as National Womxn’s History Week. Over the next several years people all around the United Snakes began to extend that week into two weeks, and eventually a month long celebration. Since 1987 every president has proclaimed March to be Womxn’s History Month.

This year’s theme is Visionary Womxn: Champions of Peace and Nonviolence. The National Women’s History Alliance, who chose this theme, say that the reasoning behind this theme is to “honor women who have led efforts to end war, violence, and injustice and pioneered the use of nonviolence to change society”. This theme is great, and is meant to acknowledge all of the amazing things that womxn have done to progress society!

As with all heritage months, this is a time to focus on a group who has contributed so much to society. It’s important to also acknowledge all the changes that womxn have created for the US and the world, especially taking into consideration the varying barriers that womxn have faced due to systemic oppression. While it’s encouraged to celebrate powerful womxn led movements, it’s also important to continue holding womxn accountable. There are pieces of history where all womxn have not been included or cherished in media and society. For this reason, it’s important to keep pushing for womxn and others to be more inclusive of everyone and their identities. For example, the spelling “womxn” has been in growing use in recent years. It came about after the traditional spelling “women” was criticized for many reasons. One being that the inclusion of “men” in the word is said to imply that “women” belong to men, and are somehow not independent people. While the spelling “womyn” has been used for a few decades, this spelling has also been criticized because it does not include transgender, agender, femme, or other womxn identifying people. So, the use of womxn is becoming more frequently in the realm of wanting to be as inclusive as possible of every womxn identifying person; and it’s a great example of how society is continuing to grow.



Events

 

March

Event

March 7-10
Seattle`

Agents of Change: 20 Remarkable Jewish Women of Washington State: Once you start looking, you'll realize that Jewish women have had a huge and positive influence on the cultural and civic life of Washington State. You might recognize the names of some of the women honored at this exhibition: librarian Nancy Pearl, philanthropist Becky Benaroya, and Sleater-Kinney rocker and writer Carrie Brownstein. But there are many more, and they've helped shape every field from sports to politics. Find out how at this pop-up museum show. Get tickets here.

 

March 9
Seattle

High Voltage Women: Breaking Barriers at Seattle City Light:  Starting in the 1970s, Radical Women Seattle founder Clara Fraser and other electrical tradeswomen working for Seattle City Light fought for affirmative action and against workplace harassment. Ellie Belew's High Voltage Women explores the ways in which these women and their allies worked to "change the culture of management abuse" and discrimination. Meet the author and Radical Women's Megan Cornish at this talk. Get tickets here.

 

March 9
Spokane

International Women’s Day Spokane 2019: Please join members of the Spokane Community as we celebrate International Women's Day 2019! Our theme this year is Balance for Better: Creative, Cultural, & Community Healing. We will feature a keynote speaker, workshops, and food to celebrate this impactful day. This event is free and open to the public, and all are welcome! Our Keynote Speaker is Idella King, and her presentation is titled: "Community Healing Through Female Indigenous Ideologies". We will feature 3 workshops: "Discovering Your Rituals of Self-Care" by Donell Barlowe, Certified Holistic Health Coach; "Tapping Your Power Within" by Bethany Montgomery and Power 2 the Poetry; and "Developing Self Compassion through Guided Meditation and Soundscapes" by Carmen Pacheco-Jones and Mokeph. RSVP here.
 

March 9- April 27
Seattle

Bechdel Test:  The Bechdel Test, named for the cartoonist Alison Bechdel, who, in a 1985 comic strip, featured a character explaining that she goes to a movie only if it has at least two women who talk to each other about something other than a man. Inspired by the Bechdel Test, Jet City Improv re-creates films that fail the test, but with a Bechdel-approved twist. You name the movie; they make it pass. Get tickets here.
 

March 12
Spokane

Women Cross Disability Panel: In honor of Women's History Month, this presentation focuses on intersecting abilities that women experience. Join us as panelist share their thoughts and experiences. RSVP here.
 

March 13
Seattle

Women and the Law: Past, Present and Future—2nd Annual Women’s History Month Program: Presented in collaboration with Washington Women Lawyers, the Washington State Supreme Court Gender and Justice Commission and the Washington State Women’s Commission. Join us for a half-day program to honor Women’s History Month. Sessions will cover a variety of topics, including discussions on the Equal Rights Amendment, RBG’s Jurisprudence and Implicit Bias. Register here.

 

March 14
Columbia City

Amber Tamblyn: Coming of Age in a Time of Rage and Revolution: In her new memoir, Era of Ignition: Coming of Age in a Time of Rage and Revolution, Amber Tamblyn traces the recent history of her own artistic and political development, beginning with the struggles she faced as a female filmmaker in the early aughts, and finishing with her decision to cofound Time's Up, an anti-harassment movement. Get ticketshere.

 

March 16
Spokane

Screening: “Maya Angelou: And Still I Rise”: Join in celebrating Women's History Month by watching a compelling documentary about Dr. Maya Angelou (1928-2014). She was a singer, dancer, activist, poet and writer who inspired generations with lyrical modern African-American thought that pushed boundaries. Best known for her autobiography I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, she gave people the freedom to think about their history in a way they never had before. This documentary sheds light on the untold aspects of her life through never-before-seen footage, rare archival photographs and videos, and her own words. Get more information here.

 

March 24
Tacoma

Becoming: An Intimate Conversation with Michelle Obama: Michelle Obama is touring the country in support of her memoir, Becoming, which focuses on different aspects of her life, like being a mother, her time in the White House, her role as a public-health figure, and “how she found her voice.” There’s no doubt that Michelle will drop cute facts about her relationship with Barack, tell a few candid details about what it’s like to be at the top, and wear something completely and utterly stunning. Get tickets here.

 

March 26
Spokane

Women's History: Power 2 the Poetry Open Mic: Power 2 the Poetry hosts a poetry open mic for Women's History Month featuring NOW. Fifteen slots are available. Sign up to read first come, first served 5:30-5:50 pm.